Books and Farmer’s Markets

Books and Farmer’s Markets

I’m in my childhood hometown of Brookings, South Dakota this long labor day weekend.  This morning I ran down to the river banks of the Big Sioux, my legs remembering the hundreds of other times I’ve run down this road to start the day.  The wind hadn’t picked up yet, and the sun was glinting off the still wet with dew prairie grass and ditch sunflowers.  Even though the view on this little jog has changed over the years – the old gravel road now dead ends at the river, the bridge now years demolished; the two new huge houses on either side of the family homestead; the fences and new driveways where we used to roam free – despite these surface changes, the energy underneath, the whisper of the prairie as the world wakes up and the ancient undulation of the landscape, remains unchanged.  It’s always good to come home, even though I no longer live here.

But anyway, I came to release the first copies of Woodland Manitou: To Be on Earth out into the world…or at least out into the hands of some folks of eastern South Dakota.  Yesterday I set up shop across from my dad’s Hillside Prairie Gardens booth at the farmer’s market, and it was an early morning of loading up the market van, helping dad set up all the veggies (hello tomato season!) into their display boxes, positioning the books so they looked inviting, and chatting with the other vendors.  There’s something about the farmer’s market.  It’s a good place to spend some time on a Saturday morning, and I always appreciate the opportunity to be part of the community that helped inform how I see the world.

I’ve had my author copies for a few weeks now, so having the physical books around was nothing new, but handing them over to people who came to purchase it was a little surreal.  As all authors probably say (or at least think at some point) I hope they like it and tell all of their friends.  I’m glad I chose to do the first release in this place.  Returning to your roots is usually a good choice, at least for me.

And people also like it when you give them free baked goods, so I baked a bunch of scones.

Because you really can’t beat a good book, a freshly made scone, and a hot cup of fair trade coffee.

Continue reading “Books and Farmer’s Markets”

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Jars of Bliss

Jars of Bliss

Red Brush Farms

On the surface, there’s not much going on with gardens in Minnesota right now.  It’s January, the temperature outside has been consistently below zero and the view up the hill to the field is awash with brown, gray and bright white.  The hoses are wound and covered with piles of snow, the berry bushes have turned brittle with the cold and the garlic that was planted a few months ago lays in wait for the spring thaw that is still months away.  A few seed catalogues have arrived, some pots have been moved to different spot in the garage and we continue to add to the compost pile at delight of the opossum that lives nearby, but activities like baking bread, starting fires in the wood stove, skiing around the lake and reading books dictate the flow of the days.  There is the coming season’s garden to plan, to be sure……

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Farm Fresh

Farm Fresh

It’s summer in Minnesota, where I live.  And summer in mid-west America means that farmer’s markets, CSAs, roadside stands, u-pick berry farms, and community gardens are in full swing.  We tend to celebrate the re-engagement with fresh foods around here because in this part of the world, winter is long and the growing season is short.  Some of us have greenhouses and high tunnels and grow lights to extend the season, but the days when tomatoes and peppers and lettuce thrive outside with only the sun above and the soil below are days to savor.

Where are you getting your produce this summer?  What takes you into the field to pick berries instead of down a grocery store isle?  What helps you wait for market day to restock your crisper drawer?  What makes you prioritize weeding your home garden over watching television in the evening?  How do you support your local farmers?  If you ARE a farmer, how do you take care of yourself as you care for your farm?  And most importantly, perhaps, what recipes do you look forward to making when things growing outside start to become abundant? (some of my favorites are found in this Prairie Grown recipe series)

Share your wisdom, and may we all enjoy the fruits of the season as we support a sustainable way of being on the earth.

 

 

Eat your veggies.

Eat your veggies.

 

I talked to a grown man last week who, when asked how he felt about his nutritional habits, responded with, “Well, I don’t eat vegetables. They make me gag and throw up.”

Huh.

There is a lot of brokenness in the way first world countries interact with food today. At this point, that pretty much goes without saying. But being able to say you don’t eat vegetables? (a staple of the human diet since the beginning of the human experience on earth) Ever? Because you don’t care for them? It’s like saying you don’t brush your teeth – ever – because you just haven’t found the perfect shade of turquoise toothbrush. It doesn’t make sense. How did we get to this place where a human being can be say, “I don’t eat vegetables” and still be alive to tell about it?

Perhaps planting an organic garden, or supporting someone who does and who will share their harvest, should be required. Kind of like taxes. You pay your taxes. You plant your garden. You eat your veggies, and you learn not to throw up. Because that makes sense.

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

A good mantra to live by, I think.  Thanks for the wise words, Michael Pollan.

                                                                                                                                                                         

If you need more ideas on how to change your eating habits to include more plants, check out the following:

Healthy Eating Plate – Harvard’s take on what to eat.

Wellness Today – The Institute for Integrative Nutrition’s nutrition article online library.

Healthy Eating Education, in the form of recipes – From The Edible SchoolYard Project.

Shop at the farmer’s market.  Plant a garden.  Learn to cook.  Avoid food that has a barcode…but if it does come in a package, make sure the ingredients list is short and recognizable.    In short, eat your veggies.  And if you can, know where they came from and how they were grown.