Cured by Flowers

Cured by Flowers

Last evening I went out to pick the last of the day’s ripe blueberries, and as I was lingering in the garden enjoying the cool dusky air, I noticed the sunflowers.  In the last week, there are four of them that have grown almost as tall as me and are starting to show signs of blossoming.  Their heads are still tight in a bud, but you can tell they are eagerly waiting the day when they can show their petals to the sun and offer themselves to the world.

I just read an excerpt from the last chapter of Anatomy of a Rose, a book by Sharman Apt Russell, and it is about being cured by flowers.  She points out that for a long time flowers have been used as medicine – from prescription drugs that contain some part of a flowering plant to folk medicine, flowers have healing properties.  There are hundreds of ways to let plants, and specifically flowers, help our bodies heal: from evening primrose to sage to cornflower to prickly poppy, flowers have the power to cure what ails us.   Continue reading “Cured by Flowers”

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Woodland Manitou: To Be on Earth

Woodland Manitou: To Be on Earth

Writing a book takes a long time.  And then publishing it takes a little bit (i.e. a lot) longer.  But it’s worth the effort and the wait, I think, to have something tangible that says what you want it to say that you can hold in your hands and give to others.  It’s fair to say that yes, it does require using trees to print the books, but when your publisher is committed to ecological stewardship, that helps.  It also helps when your publisher is committed to putting forth publications that are meant to be returned to again and again, not thrown away after a quick read.  And when they donate a portion of all profits to a different charity every year.  Add the mission that the mainstream is not the only stream, and you have a pretty stellar combination.  Continue reading “Woodland Manitou: To Be on Earth”

5 Ways to Increase the Wildness of Your Workday

5 Ways to Increase the Wildness of Your Workday

You might already be aware of the fact that work takes up a lot of time for a large number of people in modern culture.You may even be one of those folks who feels like they spend more time at the office or behind the till or at the wheel or tapping on a keyboard than is ideal for human health and happiness. And it’s also likely that you, or someone you know, are one of those folks who just doesn’t see a realistic way to do things differently right now. Maybe there’s a job change in your future, maybe you’ll move to a yurt in the Andes or maybe you’ll figure out how to finance a simple lifestyle without living the nine to five. But for many of us, there are school loans to pay, a mortgage with which to keep up, kids to care for and cars to upkeep. I’m guessing leaving it all behind to move to a cabin in the woods sounds fabulous to many reading these words….but for a lot of people, it’s just not going to happen in the next week, or month or year. Maybe it will. Maybe tomorrow will bring a shift that will allow our ideal situation to come closer into being. This post isn’t about giving up on trying to live in a way that requires less money, resources or big life changes. But it is a post about what you can do right now to feel just a tad bit more wild in your day to day. Continue reading “5 Ways to Increase the Wildness of Your Workday”

A Wild Calling

A Wild Calling

I started re-reading Clarissa Pinkola Estes’ book Women Who Run With the Wolves about a month ago. The very short synopsis is that it’s a conglomeration of ancient folk stories, myths and fairy tales from all over the world that illustrate the importance of holding onto the wild is present in all women (and men).  The book is about the powerful force, filled with good instincts, passionate creativity, and ageless knowing that is the ‘Wild Woman’, the energy that represents the instinctual nature of women.

Reading this book is making me ask questions of my own story and the stories that dictate my way of being in my family, in my community and in the world.   Some of these stories are mine.  Some of them are not. Some of them are stories that have the potential to move me further into my own story, the one that is best suited to how I want to show up in life.  And some of them are stories that I have let overshadow my own, even though they don’t serve what I need and have the potential to create pain and struggle. Continue reading “A Wild Calling”

We Are Wildness

We Are Wildness

I’ve been working with Alissa Wild and Kevin Park, the co-visionaries of We Are Wildness since January, and over the past eight months I’ve found nothing but inspiration, authenticity and a genuine presence from both of them as they continue furthering the mission to help people embrace their inner wildness and improve the health of the planet by inspiring people all over the world to reconnect with Nature.  They currently call Vancouver Island, British Columbia home, from a little cabin on the shores of a mountain fed river.  I live in Minnesota, near the St. Criox River Valley, almost 2000 miles to the east in the United States.  And recently an Ambassador program was started, and these wild souls hail from Slovenia to Colorado to the Canadian Rockies and back to Vancouver again, spreading Thoreau’s sentiment that “in wildness is the preservation of the world.” Things expand even further if we look to the online communities that have come into being on social media.  From Facebook to Twitter to Instagram, you’ll see people rewilding on almost every continent. I appreciate the vision that invites technology to serve as a catalyst fostering a return to our roots and how that vision has taken hold literally all over the world as the idea of “rewilding” gains momentum. Continue reading “We Are Wildness”